@JERRLIFE

Model Diary: Jas Gebi

As promised, here is one of the individual's I wanted to share to my readers here on JERRLIFE. Jas Gebi is a friend of mine who I first met at an interview once. Either of us didn't get the job but after constantly bumping into each other we are now friends. Jas is currently interning at a modelling agency and on a whim, decided to  take a leap of faith. Vawkkin a new diffusion line of Vawk, designed by Sunny Fong's was holding an audition for "everyday real women" to walk the show. Jas entered and this is what happened: 



Casting:
Before this, modelling wasn't something I pursued seriously for myself. When I went in, I was nervous and shaking. I expected it to be quick and impersonal. Walk and be on my merry way out. Instead, it was a warm experience and I felt comfortable. "Are you sure you haven't done this before?" Sunny Fong, the designer, who I was star struck by compliments my walk. Even Ben Barry, a giant advocate for diversity in fashion, had a pep talk with me to get over my nerves. Before I knew it, the whole thing was over and already, I wanted to do it all over again. Thankfully I was going to. At 12 midnight I received an email to let me know I have been selected to walk in the show. I had to read it 4 times before I believed I was going to do it again.
Runway Training:
A few days later I went in for the runway training. Liis thought us how to walk and how to keep a straight face on the runway. I got to talk more with Ben Barry and Liis, the modelling coach who were both supportive and learned a great deal from. Besides that, I also got to meet the other "real people" who were walking in the Vawkkin show. From working women to moms, it was a diverse group of people. Me on the other hand, young and using this opportunity to kick start a modelling career. I was honored to be part of this group.
Fitting:
A few days prior to the show fitting was schedule and wouldn't you know it, I was sick! I had school, I was blogging and  had yet to fashion week for work. Still, I went. The fitting was held at Sunny Fong's house/studio and I managed to get there early. Being in Sunny Fong's workspace, getting to see his clothes be made was an eyeful. He even managed to ask me who I wanted to see the show and have a conversation about why my parents couldn't attend. As for the fitting I don't think I was able to appreciate it fully as I was feeling under the weather. Still, this was something I could get used to.
Showtime :
The day of the show was hectic to say the least. I still had school early in the morning and my sickness had only gotten worse. With a bare face and washed hair, I made my way to the tents and it sets in that this is happening. I managed to find my way backstage to get hair and make up started. Seeing the other models, I've never felt shorter. I was intimidated and my nerves were only getting worse. After having my hair drowned in hairspray and my face slathered with foundation, I felt more legitimate as I looked in the mirror. Then I went to rehearsals and again, felt green and unprepared for this experience. "You're not walking in the middle", "You're pose is not right", "You're not turning right" were some of the critiques from the producers for the women walking the Vawkkin show. Our confidence was down and the pressure was high. Before I knew it, it was show time. Waiting for my turn felt uncomfortably long but then it was. Once I walked out it was all a blur. I only remember seeing my mom, who made it, and my boss. I also remember staring directly at the million camera flashes as I approached them with a straight face. Fifteen minutes later, it was all over and I could not believe I just walked my first runway show. Despite my fears and worries leading up to the show, I had a smile on my face that would not come down. Someone said to me once, "When it's over you'll want to do it all over again." and I did. It's official, I've been bit by the modelling bug and I insist that this is only the beginning.
You can continue following Jas Gebi's journey on her Tumblr diary.

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